PROVERBS #9 – Indian

“India Proverbs, Old Sayings and Customary Wisdom

Inspiring Quotes and Proverbial Wisdom from India about Fortune, Pride and Dignity, Time and Mortality

Street Photography in India - 50 Stunning Black & White Photos -  121Clicks.com

We can’t change the direction of the wind, but we can adjust the sails. — Indian Proverb

They who give have all things; they who withhold have nothing.– Indian Proverb

If you want to know what a tiger is like, look at a cat. — Indian Proverb

The Three great mysteries: air to a bird, water to a fish, mankind to himself. — India Proverb

There is nothing noble in being superior to some other man. The true nobility is in being superior to your previous self. — India Proverb

Like the body that is made up of different limbs and organs, all moral creatures must depend on each other to exist. — Hindu Proverb

When an elephant is in trouble even a frog will kick him. — Hindu Proverb

Like the body that is made up of different limbs and organs, all moral creatures must depend on each other to exist. — Hindu Proverb

To control the mind is like trying to control a drunken monkey that has been bitten by a scorpion. — Hindu Proverb

Great minds discuss ideas, medium minds discuss events, and little minds discuss people. — Hindu Proverb

A hundred divine epochs would not suffice to describe all the marvels of the Himalaya. — India Proverb

They who give, have all things; they who withhold, have nothing. — Indian Proverb

War is to men, childbirth is to women. — India Proverb

A thief thinks everybody steals.– India proverb

Under the mountains is silver and gold, But under the night sky, hunger and cold. — Indian proverb

35 Fantastic Indian Black & White Street Photographs - 121Clicks.com

Drops join to make a stream; ears combine to make a crop. — Indian proverb

I have lanced many boils, but none pained like my own. — India proverb

Walking slowly, even the donkey will reach Lhasa. — Indian proverb

You may look up for inspiration or look down in desperation but do not look sideways for information. — Indian proverb

Clouds that thunder seldom rain.– Indian proverb

If you live in the river you should make friends with the crocodile. — Indian proverb

A fly, a harlot, a beggar, a rat, and gusty wind; the village-boss and the tax collector – these seven are always annoying to others. — Indian proverb

Speak like a parrot; meditate like a swan; chew like a goat; and bathe like an elephant. — Indian proverb

The weakest go to the wall. — Indian proverb

A bandicoot is lovely to his parents; a mule is pretty to its mate. — Indian proverb

It is better to sit down than to stand, it is better to lie down than to sit, but death is the best of all. — Indian proverb

A person who misses a chance and the monkey who misses its branch can’t be saved. — Indian proverb

Those who hunt deer sometimes raise tigers. — India proverb

What was hard to bear is sweet to remember. — India proverb

Garlic is as good as ten mothers. — India proverb

Don’t bargain for fish which are still in the water. — India proverb

The nose didn’t smell the rotting head. — India proverb

You can often find in rivers what you cannot find in oceans. — Indian proverb

Keep five yards from a carriage, ten yards from a horse, and a hundred yards from an elephant; but the distance one should keep from a wicked man cannot be measured. — Indian proverb

In my homeland I possess one hundred horses, yet if I go, I go on foot. — Indian proverb

Blaming your faults on your nature does not change the nature of your faults. — India proverb

If they don’t exchange a few words, father and son will never know one another. — Indian proverb

Justice is better than admiration. — Indian proverb

Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the noonday sun. — Indian proverb

Do not blame God for having created the tiger, but thank him for not having given it wings. — Indian proverb

An old patient is better than a new doctor. — Indian proverb

Eat fire and your mouth burn ; live on credit and your pride will burn. — Indian proverb

To the mediocre, mediocrity appears great. — Indian proverb

Even a cat is a lion in her own lair. — Indian proverb

It is better to be blind than to see things from only one point of view. — Indian proverb”

Beautiful Indian Woman Black And White Photography 10

Source: http://www.historyofpainters.com/india_proverbs.htm

Buddhism: Compassion, Wisdom & The Path

“The Buddha taught that to realize enlightenment, a person must develop two qualities: wisdom and compassion. Wisdom and compassion are sometimes compared to two wings that work together to enable flying or two eyes that work together to see deeply.


In the West, we’re taught to think of “wisdom” as something that is primarily intellectual and “compassion” as something that is primarily emotional, and that these two things are separate and even incompatible. We’re led to believe that fuzzy, sappy emotion gets in the way of clear, logical wisdom. But this is not the Buddhist understanding.

The Sanskrit word usually translated as “wisdom” is prajna (in Pali, panna), which can also be translated as “consciousness,” “discernment,” or “insight.” Each of the many schools of Buddhism understands prajna somewhat differently, but generally, we can say that prajna is understanding or discernment of the Buddha’s teaching, especially the teaching of anatta, the principle of no self.

The word usually translated as “compassion” is karuna, which is understood to mean active sympathy or a willingness to bear the pain of others. In practice, prajna gives rise to karuna, and karuna gives rise to prajna. Truly, you can’t have one without the other. They are a means to realizing enlightenment, and in themselves, they are also enlightenment itself manifested.

Compassion as Training
In Buddhism, the ideal of practice is to selflessly act to alleviate suffering wherever it appears. You may argue it is impossible to eliminate suffering, yet the practice calls for us to make the effort.


What does being nice to others have to do with enlightenment? For one thing, it helps us realize that “individual me” and “individual you” are mistaken ideas. And as long as we’re stuck in the idea of “what’s in it for me?” we are not yet wise.

In Being Upright: Zen Meditation and the Bodhisattva Precepts, Soto Zen teacher Reb Anderson wrote, “Reaching the limits of practice as a separate personal activity, we are ready to receive help from the compassionate realms beyond our discriminating awareness.” Reb Anderson continues:

“We realize the intimate connection between the conventional truth and the ultimate truth through the practice of compassion. It is through compassion that we become thorougly grounded in the conventional truth and thus prepared to receive the ultimate truth. Compassion brings great warmth and kindness to both perspectives. It helps us to be flexible in our interpretation of the truth, and teaches us to give and receive help in practicing the precepts.”
In The Essence of the Heart Sutra, His Holiness the Dalai Lama wrote,

“According to Buddhism, compassion is an aspiration, a state of mind, wanting others to be free from suffering. It’s not passive — it’s not empathy alone — but rather an empathetic altruism that actively strives to free others from suffering. Genuine compassion must have both wisdom and lovingkindness. That is to say, one must understand the nature of the suffering from which we wish to free others (this is wisdom), and one must experience deep intimacy and empathy with other sentient beings (this is lovingkindness).”
No Thanks
Have you ever seen someone do something courteous and then get angry for not being properly thanked? True compassion has no expectation of reward or even a simple “thank you” attached to it. To expect a reward is to maintain the idea of a separate self and a separate other, which is contrary to the Buddhist goal.


The ideal of dana paramita — the perfection of giving — is “no giver, no receiver.” For this reason, by tradition, begging monks receive alms silently and do not express thanks. Of course, in the conventional world, there are givers and receivers, but it’s important to remember that the act of giving is not possible without receiving. Thus, givers and receivers create each other, and one is not superior to the other.

That said, feeling and expressing gratitude can be a tool for chipping away at our selfishness, so unless you are a begging monk, it’s certainly appropriate to say “thank you” to acts of courtesy or help.

Developing Compassion
To draw on an old joke, you get to be more compassionate the same way you get to Carnegie Hall — practice, practice, practice.

It’s already been noted that compassion arises from wisdom, just as wisdom arises from compassion. If you’re feeling neither especially wise nor compassionate, you may feel the whole project is hopeless. But the nun and teacher Pema Chodron says, “start where you are.” Whatever mess your life is right now is the soil from which enlightenment may grow.

In truth, although you may take one step at a time, Buddhism is not a “one step at a time” process. Each of the eight parts of the Eightfold Path supports all the other parts and should be pursued simultaneously. Every step integrates all the steps.

That said, most people begin by better understanding their own suffering, which takes us back to prajna — wisdom. Usually, meditation or other mindfulness practices are the means by which people begin to develop this understanding. As our self-delusions dissolve, we become more sensitive to the suffering of others. As we are more sensitive to the suffering of others, our self-delusions dissolve further.

Compassion for Yourself
After all this talk of selflessness, it may seem odd to end with by discussion compassion for oneself. But it’s important not to run away from our own suffering.


Pema Chodron said, “In order to have compassion for others, we have to have compassion for ourselves.” She writes that in Tibetan Buddhism there is a practice called tonglen which is a kind of meditation practice for helping us connect to our own suffering and the suffering of others.

“Tonglen reverses the usual logic of avoiding suffering and seeking pleasure and, in the process, we become liberated from a very ancient prison of selfishness. We begin to feel love both for ourselves and others and also we being to take care of ourselves and others. It awakens our compassion and it also introduces us to a far larger view of reality. It introduces us to the unlimited spaciousness that Buddhists call shunyata. By doing the practice, we begin to connect with the open dimension of our being.”
The suggested method for tonglen meditation varies from teacher to teacher, but it usually is a breath-based meditation in which the meditator visualizes taking in the pain and suffering of all other beings on each inhalation, and giving away our love, compassion, and joy to all suffering beings with each exhalation. When practiced with complete sincerity, it quickly becomes a profound experience, as the sensation is not one of symbolic visualization at all, but of literally transforming pain and suffering. A practitioner becomes aware of tapping into an endless well of love and compassion that is available not only to others but to ourselves. It is, therefore, a very good meditation to practice during times when you are most vulnerable yourself. Healing others also heals self, and the boundaries between self and other are seen for what they are—non-existent.”

Source: https://www.learnreligions.com/buddhism-and-compassion-449719

The Truth Meaning Behind The Bindi

“ANCIENT-ORIGINS
Bindi: Investigating the True Meaning Behind the Hindu Forehead Dot



A distinct dot is a popular forehead decoration worn mainly in South Asia – especially in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Mauritius. It is an old Hindu tradition and is known as a bindi, which means “a drop, small particle, and dot.” The word ‘Bindi’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘bindu’ and is associated with a person’s mystical third eye. Although they are rooted in the Hindu tradition, Bindis have transformed over time and have become popular accessories and fashion statements for some people. For example, several Western celebrities have been accused of cultural appropriation for wearing a bindi.

The Traditional Bindi
Traditionally, it is a bright red dot applied to the center of the forehead close to the eyebrows. But bindis can also be other colors with a sign or piece of jewelry worn upon them. Many people associate the red bindi with the ancient practice of offering blood sacrifices to appease the Gods.



It is interesting to note that in the ancient Aryan society a bridegroom made a ’tilaka’ (long vertical mark) on the bride’s forehead as a sign of wedlock. The present practice could be an extension of that tradition. Significantly, when an Indian woman has the misfortune of becoming a widow, she stops wearing the bindi and other decorations associated with married women.


Bygone Beauty and Body: The Origins of Cosmetics in the Ancient World
The Diwali Festival of Lights: A Celebration of Freedom and Good Triumphing over Evil
The Secret Substance Soma: Bringing Human Beings Closer to the Gods
he ritual of applying the Sindoor (a traditional cosmetic powder) as part of a Hindu Indian wedding.

The ritual of applying the Sindoor (a traditional cosmetic powder) as part of a Hindu Indian wedding. ( CC BY SA 3.0 ) Ceasing to wear this (and the red bindi) usually implies widowhood.

The “Sixth Chakra” and its Significance in Indian Culture
The area between the eyebrows is believed to be the sixth chakra , known as the ajna, meaning “command,” and is believed to be the seat of concealed wisdom. Tantric cults believe that during meditation latent energy rises from the base of the spine toward the head and the ajna is the outlet for this potent energy. The red dot between the eyebrows is said to retain energy in the human body and control the various levels of concentration. It is also the central point of the base of creation itself and symbolizes auspiciousness and good fortune .

The goddess Lakshmi also wears the bindi.

The goddess Lakshmi also wears the bindi. ( Public Domain )

Hindu tradition holds that all people have a third inner eye; the two physical eyes are used for seeing the external world, while the third focuses inward toward God. As such, the red dot signifies piety as well as serving as a constant reminder to keep God at the center of one’s thoughts.


18th Century illustration from Rajasthan depicting the ajna chakra.

18th Century illustration from Rajasthan depicting the ajna chakra. ( Public Domain )

Bindi Symbolism and Bindi Color Meaning
The eye-catching bindi is one of the most visually fascinating of all forms of body decoration . Hindus attach great importance to this ornamental mark between the eyebrows – a spot that has been considered a major nerve point in the human body since ancient times.

A Hindu woman wearing a red bindi.

A Hindu woman wearing a red bindi. (ellen Reitman/ CC BY SA 2.0 )

Apart from a red dot being an auspicious sign of marriage, it also is thought to guarantee the social status and sanctity of the institution of marriage. As the Indian bride steps over the threshold of her husband’s home bedecked in glittering dress and ornaments, and wearing the red bindi that is believed to usher in prosperity, it grants her a place as the guardian of the family’s welfare and progeny.

In modern times, however, the bindi’s symbolism is no longer strictly adhered to, and it is largely used as a beauty accessory or a part of women’s fashion. Traditionally, the red dot was made with a paste of turmeric powder and lemon or lime juice, dried in the sun. Now many Hindu women prefer to wear a jewel in its place.


A modern bride.

A modern bride. (Prakhar Amba/ CC BY 2.0 )

The modern dot knows no gender limits either: men as well as women can wear it. Some modern men wear it on auspicious occasions such as for ritual worship or a wedding, on festive occasions , or while embarking on or returning from a voyage or a campaign. In contrast, the tradition of men wearing the tilaka has faded in recent times – now a lot more women than men sport that decoration.

A man wearing a yellow bindi in Bangalore, India.

A man wearing a yellow bindi in Bangalore, India. (Victorgrigas/ CC BY SA 3.0 )

Other changes are seen in some single women wearing black dots, while married women wear red ones. Today, women often wear dots that match the color of their saris too.

The Allure of Blackened Teeth: A Traditional Japanese Sign of Beauty
The Hindu sacred texts about human origins
Swans Fat, Crocodile Dung, and Ashes of Snails: Achieving Beauty in Ancient Rome
Female security guard in Narayangarh, District Chitwan, Nepal wearing a black bindi.

Female security guard in Narayangarh, District Chitwan, Nepal wearing a black bindi. (Sigismund von Dobschütz/ CC BY SA 3.0 )

Controversy and Questions of Cultural (Mis)Appropriation
It takes considerable practice to achieve the perfect round shape by hand, but in modern times (and with changing fashion) women are trying out different shapes and designs. At times, “the red dot” is not a dot at all – but a straight vertical line or an oval, a triangle, or a miniature work of art made with a fine-tipped stick, dusted with gold and silver powder, studded with beads, and encrusted with glittering stones!

A modern decorative bindi.

A modern decorative bindi. (Drew/ CC BY 2.0 )

The bindi has also become popular outside South Asia in recent years, and it is often worn as a fashion statement by celebrities and others. Some men and women within traditional bindi-wearing cultures have criticized this act as one of cultural appropriation ; but they probably fail to realize that in Western showbiz and consumerist cultures it’s all about the money – and unfortunately morals or traditions tend to disappear more rapidly in the name of profit.

This is not to disregard the fact that there is much controversy around who has the right to wear a bindi. The provocative question is approached by writer and law student Vidya Ramachandran, for example, who writes :

“Unfortunately, there’s no simple answer to that question. A number of South Asian women writing on this subject have formulated their own criteria for acceptable usage of the bindi. Aarti Olivia suggests that a non-South Asian may wear a bindi if they are either getting married to a South Asian, or attending an Indian festival or ritual. Meanwhile, recognising the broader cultural significance of the bindi, Reclaim the Bindi suggests that all South Asians, including those who do not have Hindu heritage, may wear the bindi at their own discretion. I find it more useful to use these suggestions as just that — suggestions, or rough guidelines for behaviour, rather than steadfast rules. It is literally impossible to come up with an exhaustive list of acceptable situations for wearing a bindi […]”