HIS-TORY = His Story

“The idea that “history” comes from “his story” is meant as an illustrative tool that much of what is known about history, and what is taught about history, comes from the male perspective and concerns male spheres of influence, particularly in political and military history. It’s not an etymological explanation (beyond folk etymology).”

History is a story we have been told from the conquers of wars and manipulators of humanity.

What is our true history?

All About TRUST

“We have all been hurt and experienced pain at some point in our lives. That pain compromises our trust and can transform our perspective on life. It is natural psychologically to defend ourselves when we feel vulnerability would be dangerous, but trust is as much a blessing for our own mental health as it is a gift for those we chose to trust. When trauma or pain takes away our ability to trust others, this means it is continually hurting us and depriving us of deep, meaningful bonds.

Our spiritual heart-felt side cannot thrive if we keep ourselves walled up. While we must be careful with whom we decide to open up with, it is not healthy to withdraw trust from everyone. Every relationship whether intimate, professional or family based requires a certain level of trust.

What is Trust

Trust refers to our ability to confidently believe that someone else’s intentions are good towards us. It is our ability to predict someone’s behavior and how they will respond to situations. Trust is just as much logical and based on evidence as it is emotional and instinctual. We FEEL trust, but we also calculate it.

The Future of Trust | Download

Much of our social interactions are based on a give and take system, trust is a crucial part of this. When we marry someone and choose to trust them with our well-being, we have certain expectations of what they will give to the relationship as well as what we will give. Even if you consider the act of buying a car, it is natural to have more trust in a dealer selling you a certified used car with a warranty versus someone off the street that might give you a better deal but no warranty.

It comes down to this. If you believe someone will do right by you even in a difficult situation, you have trust in them. If you are unsure if someone will do right by you, then you don’t trust them.

Developing Trust

It takes time to develop trust in someone, this is typically not an overnight process although in some social situations such as with a religious leader, we tend to expect trustworthiness out of them. As we have more social interactions and experiences together we start to notice their trends which either indicate they are dependable or not trustworthy.

In some situations, the other person is asked to sacrifice something such as money or time to meet our needs, those situations draw us closer to them and allow us to let our guards down. Although it is inevitable we will have to take a leap of faith at some point to develop deep and significant trust.

Trust in Relationships

The depth of our trust we develop in a relationship is so important as it relates to the extent we commit ourselves and invest. Considering the give and take social system, we give a lot more of ourselves to someone when we trust them and in return, we hope to receive that back. Insecurity about whether someone will act in our better interest causes us to withdraw emotionally, spiritually and often physically from that person. We will create a psychological distance from the other person as a means of defense.

Think of it like building a castle around our heart, we allow them to roam outside of our castle, but we won’t let down the drawbridge so easily. It is impossible to be close to someone if we won’t let them inside. Naturally, the person roaming the castle will grow tired and eventually withdraw, thus ending the relationship. This can relate to business partnerships and friendships just as much as intimate relationships.

Teamwork — Stock Photo © katy89 #32457105

Can You Trust Again?

Even if you have been badly hurt and betrayed, perhaps in a very traumatic situation, you can learn to trust people again. You have the power to decide if you will let their actions continue to hurt you and impact your ability to trust others or if you will make the choice to move forward, heal and work on trusting others.

4 Steps Towards Learning to Trust Again

  1. Trust yourself. You cannot expect to trust others if you don’t trust yourself. Do not blame yourself for the past pain that robbed you of trust. Remember you are making the choice to stop giving power to that pain. Have faith in your judgment and don’t doubt yourself based upon past experiences.
  2. Forgiveness. This doesn’t mean you are forgetting or condoning what the other person did, but you are choosing to be the better person and extend forgiveness to them as well as yourself. You are refusing to let their bad choices dictate your future. Every major religion in the world promotes forgiveness and mercy. Not just as an act of charity, but as a means of healing your own heart.

…you do not do evil to those who do evil to you, but you deal with them with forgiveness and kindness…

  1. Stop victimizing yourself. We always have a choice when we are hurt, to remain the victim or to become stronger. No matter how harsh of a pain you endured, it is your choice to use it as a crutch and stay withdrawn OR take the steps forward toward healing. I have often heard the expression that which does not kill you only makes you stronger, it is true if you allow it to be. Stop being the victim, start being the victor. No one will hand you the ability to trust again, you must work toward it.
  2. Accept vulnerability. Trust requires being vulnerable, which yes that means you must accept the risk you might get hurt. Every time we trust someone it is a careful risk calculation. Without the occasional leaps of faith, you will never know the extent of trust and love you can experience.

Final Thoughts

Trust is a critical component of our mental well-being, if we cannot trust anyone else then we lack trust in our own judgment. To achieve our happiest and most positive state of mind, we must allow ourselves to be vulnerable. That doesn’t mean we never have our guards up, of course, we must be mindful of who has access to our heart and the ability to harm us. Trust is a careful calculation of risk and reward. You have the ability to learn how to trust again, I did.”

Source: https://blogs.psychcentral.com/spirituality/2018/08/learning-how-to-trust-again/

PSYCHEDELICS: DMT – The Spirit Molecule


DMT — or N, N-dimethyltryptamine in medical talk — is a hallucinogenic tryptamine drug. Sometimes referred to as Dimitri, this drug produces effects similar to those of psychedelics, like LSD and magic mushrooms.

DMT is a Schedule I controlled substance in the United States, which means it’s illegal to make, buy, possess, or distribute it. Some cities have recently decriminalized it, but it’s still illegal under state and federal law.

Healthline does not endorse the use of any illegal substances, and we recognize abstaining from them is always the safest approach. However, we believe in providing accessible and accurate information to reduce the harm that can occur when using.


Where does it come from?
DMT naturally occurs in many plant species, which have been used in religious ceremonies in some South American countries for centuries.

It can also be made in a laboratory.

Is it the same thing as ayahuasca?
Kind of. DMT is the main active ingredient ayahuasca.

Ayahuasca is traditionally prepared using two plants called Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. The latter contains DMT while the former contains MAOIs, which prevent certain enzymes in your body from breaking down DMT.


Does it really naturally exist in your brain?
No one knows for sure.

Some experts believe the pineal gland produces it in the brain and releases it when we dream.

Others believe it’s released during birth and death. Some go further to say this release of DMT at death may be responsible for those mystical near-death experiences you sometimes hear about.

What does it feel like?
As with most drugs, DMT can affect people in very different ways. Some truly enjoy the experience. Others find it overwhelming or frightening.



As far as its psychoactive effects, people have described feeling like they’re traveling at warp speed through a tunnel of bright lights and shapes. Others describe having an out-of-body experience and feeling like they’ve changed into something else.

There are also some who report visiting other worlds and communicating with elf-like beings.

Some people also report a pretty rough comedown from DMT that leaves them feeling unsettled.


How is it consumed?
Synthetic DMT usually comes in the form of a white, crystalline powder. It can be smoked in a pipe, vaporized, injected, or snorted.

When used in religious ceremonies, plants and vines are boiled to create a tea-like drink of varying strengths.

How long does it take to work?
Synthetic DMT kicks in pretty fast, producing effects within 5 to 10 minutes.

Plant-based brews tend to produce effects within 20 to 60 minutes.

How long does it last?
The intensity and duration of a DMT trip depends on several things, including:

-how much you use
-how you use it
-whether you’ve eaten
-whether you’ve taken other drugs
Generally, the effects of inhaled, snorted, or injected DMT last for about 30 to 45 minutes.

Drinking it in a brew like ayahuasca can leave you tripping for anywhere from 2 to 6 hours.

Does it cause any side effects?
DMT is a powerful substance that can cause a number of mental and physical side effects. Some of these are desirable, but others not so much.

Possible mental effects of DMT include:

-euphoria
-floating
-vivid hallucinations
-altered sense of time
-depersonalization
Keep in mind that some people experience lingering mental effects for days or weeks after use.

Physical effects of DMT can include:

-rapid heart rate
-increased blood pressure
-visual disturbances
-dizziness
-dilated pupils
-agitation
-paranoia
-rapid rhythmic eye movements
-chest pain or tightness
-diarrhea
-nausea or vomiting

Are there any risks?
Yes, some of them potentially serious.

DMT’s physical side effects of raising both heart rate and blood can be risky, especially if you have a heart condition or already have high blood pressure.

Using DMT may also cause:

-seizures
-loss of muscle coordination, which. -increases the risk of falls and injury
confusion
It may also be associated with respiratory arrest and coma.

Like other hallucinogenic drugs, DMT may cause persistent psychosis and hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (HPPD). Both are rare and more likely to occur in people with preexisting mental health conditions.

Serotonin syndrome warning
DMT can result in high levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. This can lead to a potentially life threatening condition called serotonin syndrome disorder.

People who use DMT while taking antidepressants, especially monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), have a higher risk for developing this condition.

Seek immediate medical attention if you’ve used DMT and experience the following symptoms:

-confusion
-disorientation
-irritability
-anxiety
-muscle spasms
-muscle rigidity
-tremors
-shivering
-overactive reflexes
-dilated pupils

Any other interactions to know about?
DMT can interact with a range of other prescription and over-the-counter medications, as well as other drugs.

If you’re using DMT, avoid mixing it with:

-alcohol
-antihistamines
-muscle relaxants
-opioids
-benzodiazepines
-amphetamines
-LSD, aka acid
-mushrooms
-ketamine
-gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), aka liquid V and liquid G
-cocaine
-cannabis

Is it addictive?
The jury is still out on whether DMT is addictive, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

What about tolerance?
Tolerance refers to needing to use more of a particular drug over time to achieve the same effects. Based on research from 2013, DMT doesn’t appear to induce tolerance.

Harm reduction tips
DMT is extremely powerful, even though it naturally occurs in several plant species. If you’re going to try it, there are a few steps you can take to reduce your risk for having a bad reaction.

Keep these tips in mind when using DMT:

-Strength in numbers. Don’t use DMT alone. Do it in the company of people you trust.
-Find a buddy. Make sure you have at least one sober person around who can intervene if things take a turn.
-Consider your surroundings. Be sure to use it in a safe and comfortable place.
-Take a seat. Sit or lie down to reduce the risk of falling or injury while you’re tripping.
-Keep it simple. Don’t combine DMT with alcohol or other drugs.
-Pick the right time. The effects of DMT can be pretty intense. As a result, it’s best to use it when you’re already in a positive state of mind.
-Know when to skip it. Avoid using DMT if you’re taking antidepressants, have a heart condition, or already have high blood pressure.

The bottom line
DMT is a naturally occurring chemical that’s been used for centuries in religious ceremonies in several South American cultures. Today, its synthetic from is used for its powerful hallucinogenic effects.

If curious about trying DMT, it’s important to take certain steps to reduce your risk for serious effects. This includes making sure any prescription of over-the-counter medications you take won’t cause a bad reaction.

If you’re concerned about your drug use, get in touch with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for free and confidential help. You can also call their national helpline at 800-622-4357 (HELP).”

Source: https://www.healthline.com/health/what-is-dmt#dmt-vs-ayahuasca